Grand Traverse Astronomical Society

About...

The Grand Traverse Astronomical Society is a nonprofit organization dedicated to to education and enjoyment of the night sky. Established in 1982, the GTAS has about 50 members from the Grand Traverse area. Meetings are held on the first Friday of every month beginning at 8 p.m. at Northwestern Michigan College's Joseph H. Rogers Observatory, though one of the summer meetings may be preempted by the annual picnic at another location. Topics of discussion range from current sky happenings to latest discoveries and theories. Guests are always welcome.
Over 750 attended the society sponsored Comet Hyakutake Watches March 23, and 24th, 1996. The farthest traveler came from Detroit to enjoy the dark skies and the spectacular comet through many telescopes. Comet Hale-Bopp attracted approximately 1,400 during the three scheduled viewing nights that were clear.
GTAS members Jerry Dobek and Judy Wieske took a spectacular photograph of Comet Hyakutake with the Rogers Observatory's Schmidt camera, and can be viewed from the Rogers Observatory Web page.
The GTAS belongs to the International Dark-Sky Association.
Society Officers Elected May 2004:

President

Gary Carlisle

Vice President

Bob Moler

Secretary

Jerry Dobek

Treasurer

Judy Wieske

Newsletter
Editor

Bill Renis



Waiting for dark – GTAS Picnic and Star Party 2002

Here are more photos from the GTAS Picnic August 2, 2002

    Getting ready to eat

    Suttons Bay, and Grand Traverse Bay including the Old Mission Penninsula

Programs of Upcoming Meetings:

Community Service:

Scheduling Observatory Visits:


GTAS Public Viewing Nights at the Rogers Observatory

Note: Viewing hours may be extended if weather conditions and staffing permit.



Public Viewing Nights - 2005

DOW

Date

Time

Comments

Saturday

April 2nd

9 -11 p.m.

Dark, Saturn, Jupiter, Orion Nebula

Saturday

April 16th

9 -11 p.m.

Moon, Saturn, Jupiter

Saturday

May 7th

9 -11 p.m.

Twilight, Venus early, Saturn, Jupiter, Dark late

Friday

May 20th

9 -11 p.m.

Twilight, Venus early, Moon, Saturn, Jupiter

Saturday

June 4th

9 -11 p.m.

Twilight, Venus early, Saturn, Jupiter

Friday

June 17th

9 -11 p.m.

Twilight, Mercury, Venus early, Moon, Saturn, Jupiter

Saturday

July 2nd

9 -11 p.m.

Twilight, Mercury, Venus early, Jupiter

Friday

July 15th

9 -11 p.m.

Twilight, Venus early, Moon, Jupiter

Saturday

July 30th

9 - 11 p.m.

Twilight, Venus early, Jupiter, dark, Summer Milky Way near end

Saturday

August 13th

9 p.m. - ?

Venus early, Moon, Jupiter, extended for Perseids

Friday

August 26th

9 - 11 p.m.

Jupiter, Venus early (marginal), Summer Milky Way

Saturday

September 10th

9 - 11 p.m.

Moon, Mars late

Friday

September 30th

9 – 11 p.m.

Dark, Summer Milky Way, Mars late

Saturday

October 15th

8 – 10 p.m.

Venus early, Moon, Mars

Saturday

November 5th

8 - 10 p.m.

Venus early, Moon, Mars

Saturday

December 3rd

8 - 10 p.m.

Dark, Mars, Orion Nebula



Note: Viewing hours may be extended if weather conditions and staffing permit.

* Comet, Venus Transit of the sun and the Lunar Eclipse watches will be canceled if cloudy.

Explanation Key

Conditions

Dark
Dark skies. Deeps Sky Objects (star clusters, nebulae and galaxies) visible depending on the season.
Twilight
Twilight lasts through out the viewing period. Some Deep Sky Objects may be visible near the end of the viewing period.

Objects other than planets

Orion Nebula
A stellar nursery 1,800 light years away. The best and closest such object. Visible on winter evenings.
Summer Milky Way
Many Deep Sky Objects are visible in our galaxy. The Milky Way is best seen on August and September evenings.

In Case of Inclement Weather

For more information on events at the Rogers Observatory call (231)995-2300


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Updated: 03/12/05